Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT) for western Oregon and western Washington
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Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT) for western Oregon and western Washington

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Published by Oregon State University Extension Service in [Corvallis, Or.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Soils -- Nitrate content -- Testing.,
  • Dairy cattle -- Manure -- Handling.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementE.S. Marx ... et al.
SeriesNutrient management for dairy production, EM -- 8650., EM (Oregon State University. Extension Service) -- 8650.
ContributionsMarx, E. S., Oregon State University. Extension Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination[4] p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18062058M

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This test is called the Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT). The basis for this new N soil testing approach is taking soil samples just before sidedressing— after the spring wet period but before the period of major N demand by corn—and determining the nitrate-N available in the soil at that time. 1. Evaluate the use of pre-sidedress soil nitrate testing (PSNT) to estimate sidedress N requirement of cool-season vegetables. 2. Document the accuracy of an on-farm soil ‘quick test’ for NO 3-N determination. 3. Survey commercial vegetable fields in the Salinas and Santa Maria Valleys to determine the range of soil NO 3-N concentrations. The Magdoff Pre‐Sidedress Nitrate Test (PSNT) is a soil test that provides more accurate fertilizer N recommendations for corn than previous N recommendation systems based on anticipated effects of manure and crop management. Using the test can result in significant reductions of fertilizer N use on high‐N supplying by: This test is called the Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT). The basis for this new N soil testing approach is taking soil samples just before sidedressing--after the spring wet period but before the period of major N demand by corn--and determining the nitrate-N available in the soil at that time. The results are then used to make sidedress N recommendations.

The soil nitrate content is often spatially variable. For this reason, a minimum of 20 cores should be taken and composited to represent a field or management area [8]. While the pre-plant nitrate test is generally taken to a depth of one to four feet, depending on the rooting depth of the crop, the pre-sidedress nitrate test is most often.   The only soil nitrate test calibrated in Iowa is the late spring soil nitrate test (LSNT, also called the pre-sidedress nitrate test or PSNT in other states). Soil samples for that test are collected when corn is six to twelve inches in height. So, a very specific timing of soil sampling for the LSNT test (typically occurs late May through early June). Sampling before and after that timing invalidates use of the . The primary tool for soil N sampling in the Eastern Corn Belt has been the pre-sidedress soil nitrate test (PSNT) which is most applicable as an indicator of N availability in soils where manure had been applied or a legume such as clover or alfalfa had been plowed down (Brouder & Mengel, ). For these field situations, the level of soil. The Pre-sidedress Nitrate Test (PSNT) is an inseason soil nitrate test that can be used to determine if additional fertilizer nitrogen (N) is needed for corn. This test is taken at sidedressing time just before the period of major N demand by corn. The PSNT is designed to: 1 estimate the soil’s nitrate .

The Pre-Sidedress Nitrate Test is a soil test for nitrate Only calibrated for corn, wheat and barley in Virginia Must be performed when corn is about 12” tall and immediately before side dressing inorganic N, or immediately before planting for wheat/barley Can be used to decrease N recommendation if soil has high nitrate. The Agronomy Handbook is a comprehensive resource that discusses soil properties, plant essential nutrients, as well as soil test results and recommendations. It also covers soil sampling, fertilizer application methods, nutrient deficiency symptoms in plants, plant tissue analysis, nutrient uptake and removal in crops, and conversion factors. Below are five soil test examples, including discussion about what they tell us and the types of practices farmers should follow to satisfy plant nutrient needs on these soils. Suggestions are provided for conventional farmers and organic producers. These are just suggestions— there are other satisfactory ways to meet the needs of crops growing on [ ]. Using the Pre-Sidedress Soil Nitrate Test to Improve Nitrogen Management in Vegetable Cropping Systems Nitrogen (N) is essential to nearly every aspect of plant growth, but it is one of the most difficult nutrients to manage. When plant available N exceeds crop demand, nitrate accumulates in soil increasing the risk of ground water contamination.